From the category archives:

Triptykos in Africa

Marin IJ Profiles Andy Dreitcer’s Work in Zimbabwe

by Facilitator on December 26, 2009

Andy Dreitcer

Andy Dreitcer

The Marin Independent Journal just ran a story on Triptykos co-founder Andy Dreitcer, and his recent trip to Zimbabwe. The article is titled “The Healer.” You can find it here.

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Part 2: The Long Road to Healing in Zimbabwe

by Facilitator on November 28, 2009

Mark Yaconelli with Petros Mufunde, one of the workshop organizers

Mark Yaconelli with Petros Mufunde, one of the workshop organizers

Today the Ashland Tidings printed the second part of the report on the Zimbabwe workshop.  You can read it here.

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First Press on Zimbabwe Meeting

by Facilitator on November 21, 2009

yaconelli tidingsThe Ashland Daily Tidings, my local paper here in Oregon, has just published a report on the Zimbabwe experience.  Part two is set to print next Saturday.  You can see it here.  Apologies for the goofy smile.
We’re drafting a larger article that we’re hoping to print in a national outlet.  We have a number of contacts that will look at it next week.    Tomorrow, Sunday,  I’ll be handed the morning worship service at Ashland Congregational in order to do a 45 minute narrative/re-enactment of the final day of the Zimbabwe National Healing and Reconciliation Workshop.
–Mark 

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Reflections on Zimbabwe

by Facilitator on November 15, 2009

Andy and friend after Sunday worship in Mutare

Andy and friend after Sunday worship in Mutare

 
When I arrived home, the first thing I did was walk around the house and down the street into town to look at things. Just look. I wanted to compare my town with Mutare; to wonder about what it would be like to have the buildings and streets and whole infrastructure slowly crumbling for lack of tax money and jobs and financial stability; to ponder the possibility of neighbors and acquaintances being perpetrators of violence or victims of beatings or worse; and to consider whether those of us here who pride ourselves on a can-do spirit would  truly maintain — as my Zimbabwean friends have — hope, resilience, fortitude, centeredness, faith, and internal stability in the face of  rampant bleakness. Yes, I looked at what I have — and I continued to marvel at the strength of the people I met in Mutare. Nothing there is easy. The unpredictability of every moment builds patience. Even I became more patient while I was there (though quickly reverted upon returning home).

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Lingering Impressions: Christianity is Alive in Zimbabwe

by Facilitator on November 12, 2009

Frank talks with Gift Machinga during a break

Frank talks with Gift Machinga during a break

            I have been home four days, savoring favorite foods—available in abundance, reconnecting with the classroom and students, and soaking in warm reunions with my loved ones. Ever-present, however, like a continuous musical backdrop, play the memories and melodies of these beautiful Zimbabwean people, people who are grateful to have stocks of food at all grace the shelves of their grocery stores, people who endure unemployment at the staggering rate of 90 percent, people whose loved ones, one out of two, have either disappeared or fled to safer environs. As these memories continue to linger, and as they inform my responses to the dozens of inquiries about our trip, they have clustered around three refrains—the pain, the courage, and the awe-inspiring faith that reverberates throughout the Zimbabwean people. continue reading

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A Blessing from Zimbabwe

by Facilitator on November 12, 2009

As I reflect on Zimbabwe I share much of what Frank and Andy have offered.  I too am dreaming of Zimbabwe each night since my return–the singing, the kind faces, the generous spirit, the will and determination by pastors and community leaders to become a source of healing and truth in the midst of so much pain and danger.  To see my own life, my own country in the light of Zimbabwe is to face three hard truths:

  1. Much of what occupies my life and the life of so many in my country is often trivial.  In Zimbabwe we met people struggling with real problems (hunger, illness, poverty, justice).  It is no surprise to me that because they struggle with real problems they also have a great capacity for real joy, real faith, real hope.  In my life, and the lives of so many of the economically privileged, we worry our lives away.  We spend hours upon hours anxious about our appearance, our possessions, our status and achievements.  Because we don’t address the real pain and struggles of this life we also short circuit our capacity for real courage, real imagination, real relationship (with ourselves and others), and real joy. continue reading

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